The Genesis of This Book / Works Consulted

Go To the Forward & Introduction to all Three Volumes of So That The World May Believe

 [I am taking the opportunity here at the very end of this first Internet Edition of So That The World May Believe to quickly write about some of my mental processes and the many sources I used to write this book.] 

It would be impossible for me to write a complete bibliography of every work I consulted to make this book, since it is the result of years of research for other projects (formal and informal) and years of prayerful reflection on what I have read and studied.  Though I am not a coffee drinker, I will borrow some “coffee terms” and say that the sections of this book have been “brewing” and “percolating” in my mind for years.  The things I read and study stay with me and turn around and around in my mind over and over until they “click” into place, until the (often subtle) connections become more clear to me.  Whenever I read a new fact or hear a new opinion or interpretation, it gets “thrown into the percolator” to add its own character to the mix, it joins the things turning around in the back of my mind which come to the front whenever I am not directly engaged in something else.  As this mental process is essentially constant, I have an “absent-minded professor” personality.  Since I perceive a “call of God” upon my heart to help reunite His Church, I find just about every stray thought of mine goes back to topics which found their way into this book. 

The Genesis of this Book 

This three-volume book began as a research paper for world-reknowned Catholic Mariologist Dr. Mark Miravalle, STD, which I later expanded into Who is Mary in the Church? (Volume II of this book).  The original term paper had been written with future Protestant as well as Catholic Christian readers in mind, but, understanding just how controversial Mary (unnecessarily) is among today’s divided Christians,  I really wanted to emphasize the loving ecumenical Christian context in which Mary should be discussed by Christians who disagree about her.  So I wrote an ecumenical forward to the book which kept getting longer and longer the more I reflected on everything I wanted to say to put the Mary discussion in the best ecumenically-minded context.  After I finished writing Who is Mary in the Church? (Draft 5), I realized that in it I had already answered what had been my own biggest objection (when I was a Protestant Evangelical) to the papacy: the mistaken belief that the Catholic Church’s popes had dogmatized Marian doctrines which somehow compromised the essential fundamentals of traditional, orthodox Christian faith.  Thus I felt motivated to add an appendix to Who is Mary in the Church? which further explained some of the positive reasons Catholic Christians have for their belief in the papacy, as well, which I entitled The Papacy and Christian Unity in Diversity.  The appendix kept getting longer and longer, until, like the forward, it was book-length in its own right.  Then I had the wonderful opportunity to meet an actual Vatican II Council Father, 84 years old but “still bearing fruit in old age” – cf Psalm 92:14.  He liked my contributions to the seminar he was giving and gave me his personal microphone and asked me to repeat my contributions for the videographer during the break and asked me to send him a copy of my book after his tour of giving retreats was over.  I felt inspired at that time to reorganize the entire work before I sent it to him, keeping Who is Mary in the Church? essentially as it was but now as Volume II of a much bigger ecumenical work entitled So That The World May Believe.  The appendix became Volume III and much of my very lengthy forward became chapters of Volume I (the rest remained as a much shorter forward to Who is Mary in the Church?).  I filled out Volume I with some new material and some long excerpts from other works of mine.  I have done little new research in the first drafts and these Internet Editions of Volumes I and III, and they largely represent my reflected musings on a large amount of past research which my “absent-minded professor” brain has been processing for years. 

At this time I consider Volumes I and III to be (very readable) first drafts which incorporate some lengthy excerpts from other book manuscripts (most of them which started as research papers) which I spent much more time on.  At this time my overall situation has changed and I am unable to continue work on this project (To help change this, see Prayer and Donations Support).  However, I believe in its current form, wherein Volumes I and III are not near as complete nor polished as Volume II (which is a 6th draft), but are in complete sentences, paragraphs, sub-headings and chapters which have a good “flow” of ideas, this book can already be read and understood and enjoyed (I hope it can already be a motivating force in the world towards re-establishing Christian unity in diversity).  I think I get out the “main ideas” I wish to put into these volumes even though they are not yet finished and polished.  I will be distributing So That The World May Believe in this form both for constructive feedback from various sources from all major branches of currently divided Christianity, to improve later editions of this book, and to finally get out the basics of the message I believe God has placed on my heart, even as a “burning in the bones,” of ancient Christian unity in diversity and how to re-establish it “so that the world may believe.” 

The Church in England’s Scholarly Gift to the Whole Church to Which I Am Indebted 

This book describes my conviction that all of the divided Christians Churches which hold the same essential Christian faith have different (often culturally-based) emphases which together enrich the whole Christian Church which is meant to be constituted in the form of a mutually-enriching unity in diversity as in the Undivided Early Church.  I am greatly indebted to the fact that the Church of England, which has strong ties both to Protestantism and Catholicism (and in many ways is the “middle way” between them), and British culture generally, has had a particular emphasis on scholarship (evidenced in the Encyclopaedia Britannica), and especially scholarship in Church History.  My major sources for Church history include entirely Protestant scholarship in English such as:

1. the classic 38 Volume American Reprint of the “Edinburgh Edition” collection of the documents of the Early Church Fathers from Apostolic times to 600 AD translated into English, a project itself based on an earlier (1837) Oxford and London “Library of the Fathers” English translation collection which specifically intended to demonstrate that the Church of England with its “middle way” between Protestantism and Catholicism was the closest to the lived reality of the Early Church; and

2. Philip Schaff’s classic 8 Volume History of the Christian Church (Swiss-born Schaff went to England where he met leaders of the Anglican Oxford Movement, and he settled in America, becoming a major contributor to Church History scholarship in English, including being one of the editors of the two later series of the above American Reprint of the “Edinburgh Edition.”  In 1866 he became one of the founders of the American Evangelical Alliance).

Although the introductory essays to the translations and Schaff’s History contain some anti-Catholic interpretations of history, I always distinguished between the agreed facts of history and the interpretation of history.   It is in fact such (anti-Catholic) Protestant interpretation of history which has led logically to the pitiful uncertainty about if not rejection of traditional, orthodox, supernaturally empowering Christianity which characterizes “doctrinally liberal” or “unorthodox” Protestant Christianity in the oldest and largest Protestant “mainline” denominations (such as the one I was raised in, and in mainstream Anglicanism today).  Thus it is that on the one hand I am indebted greatly to Anglican and other English Protestant scholarship which collected together so many of the facts of Christian history with scholarly, academic rigor, although on the other hand as a traditional, orthodox Christian, I find that I must reject anti-Catholic interpretations of that history if I want to remain in the supernaturally empowering Christian faith of the Early Church for the long term.  John Henry Newman, who like me, had been raised a Protestant Evangelical, was the premier Anglican scholar of the 19th Century, involved in the initial Anglican project of translating the entire Early Church Fathers into English, but he too discovered this and eventually became a Roman Catholic Cardinal who prepared the way for many of the Catholic Church’s wonderful reforms (many still as-yet unimplemented) in Vatican II.  Cardinal Newman saw that like the rest of mainstream Protestantism which was already losing orthodoxy in his day, even the Church of England (which he previously regarded as being the ideal “middle way” between Protestantism and Catholicism) could not sustain basic traditional Christian orthodoxy in the long term either without becoming Catholic (his 19th Century prediction has largely come true in the 20th Century’s widespread “doctrinal liberalism”); but he also saw that the Catholic Church of his day had strayed from its ideal expression in that Undivided Early (Catholic) Church which was his area of tremendous scholarly expertise.  Thus as a good Catholic Christian hierarch he helped pave the way for the further needed Catholic Church reforms which found full expression on paper a century later at Vatican Council II (though they have yet to be fully implemented within the Catholic Church). 

Although many high-ranking Anglican churchmen have become Roman Catholic since Newman on the basis of the mainstream Anglican/Episcopalian Church losing its grip on traditional Christian faith and morality (while the Anglo-Catholic and Evangelical Anglican streams remain orthodox because they are so “Catholic at heart”), it is my hope that this book of mine, which has relied so much on Anglican historical scholarship which is a gift and “specialty” of Anglican Christianity, can help pave the way for true reunification of the Church of England with the ancient Catholic Communion of orthodox Sister Churches known collectively as the Catholic Church – so that Anglicanism can remain orthodox in the long term and thus so that orthodox Anglican prelates no longer have to leave the Church of England to become Roman Catholic to maintain orthodoxy.  The first Archbishop of Canterbury was sent to England by the Pope in the First Millennium and I would love to see today’s Archbishop of Canterbury, head of the worldwide Anglican Communion, take his proper place as Patriarch of the Anglican Rite of the Catholic Church, wherein Catholic Communion guarantees the long-term orthodoxy of the Church of England which has been so strained because of Anglicanism’s current Protestant connections, but Anglicans can be themselves with their many distinct gifts to enrich the whole Church instead of having to become Roman Catholic in order to remain traditional orthodox Christians as so many Anglicans have felt the need to. 

[Update: Recently, the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) within the Anglo-Catholic Stream of Anglicanism has formally rejoined the Catholic Communion as an “ordinariate” of the Anglican Rite within the Roman Patriarchate of the Catholic Church.  As more Anglicans reunify with the Catholic Church Communion they ideally should enlarge this already-reunified Anglican Rite body which should eventually be formally recognized as the (Roman) Anglican Catholic Church or the re-established Anglican ‘Sister’ Church within the Catholic Communion of orthodox Christian Sister Churches under the Roman Patriarchate – according to the model of the Undivided Early Catholic Church.]  

Scholarly Resources in Electronic Editions 

I am very fortunate to live in the age that I do since I have a call upon my heart to help reunite Christ’s divided Church.  Many of the current divisions among Christians are at least partially results of Christians losing contact with each other, the first major occasion being after the fall of the (Christian) Western Roman Empire to barbarian tribes (later Christianized) which caused a severe reduction in contact between the (now-barbarian) Western Church of the Roman Patriarchate and the still-sophisticated Eastern Churches of the (Christian) Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, especially the Byzantine Patriarchate of Constantinople.  Long ignorance of each other has caused separated churches to remain separate, later contact between divided churches which once were one often unfruitful because much time apart made each side seem so foreign to the other they forgot they were once a family whose differences were mutually enriching

Never before this age have the documents of all the branches of the Church Family been so available, and never before have they been so easy to examine.  I would say that Church reunification was impossible before this age because before now we never had the ability to really study and come to understand each other, and neither did we have such easy contact with each other through modern travel, telecommunications, and immigration.  It has been magnificent for me as a scholar to have access to vast amounts of documents in my first language of English, and to have so many of them available in electronic editions which are easy to research and study.  I can search 20,000 pages of the Early Church documents for topics or key words with a computer search engine which saves months of traditional research time.  I have over 20 Bible translations (as well as original language texts and resources) on my computer which I can easily compare when I am examining a particular passage of Scripture.  I have a couple dozen Bible commentaries, Catholic, Protestant, and even Messianic Jewish, which I can compare to see different perspectives on a certain passage of Scripture at the touch of a button, and currently a total of nearly 1000 titles in my electronic Christian Scholar’s Library which can be searched for topics or key terms by computer in seconds.  I was privileged to be an “Independant Sales Representative” (or “iRep”) for Logos Research Systems (now simply Logos Bible Software), in which capacity I gave Bible Study Software workshops (and sold Bible software) at Catholic and Evangelical Churches and even a ‘Messianic Jewish’ congregation.  Although there are a number of very good electronic Bible Study programs available, notably BibleWorks, Logos Bible Software is unparalleled in being not only excellent Bible Study software (in English and the original languages) but also an electronic publishing format which has literally tens of thousands of hyper-linked Christian books available, including major reference works and primary historical sources including the Early Church Fathers, prominent medieval theologians like Saint Anselm and Saint Thomas Aquinas, and complete works of most of the major Protestant Reformers, as well as a vast array of 19th to 21st Century Christian scholarship and theological and pastoral works from many demoninational perspectives.  All of this readily available material shows the great contributions to the whole Church made by all of the major branches of today’s divided Christianity, as well as demonstrating various the human weaknesses and problems on all sides (I note with interest that Logos publishes a [Standard] Protestant Edition and a “Special Catholic Edition” of the 38-Volume Early Church Fathers in English translation mentioned above.  Both are entirely the work of Protestant scholars, but the “Special Catholic Edition” contains only the translations of the Early Church documents prefaced by minimal translator’s notes.  The standard Protestant Edition contains additional lengthy introductory essays which include both many useful historical background facts and some anti-Catholic interpretations of history which, as I said above, in the long-term only serve to bolster Protestant “doctrinal liberalism” or unorthodoxy, since the Catholic Church has retained several elements of the Undivided Early Church lost in the Protestant Reformation which make the Catholic Church immune to the loss of basic Christian orthodoxy which is so widespread in Protestantism.  Though a Catholic Christian, I own the standard Protestant Edition because the introductory essays contain do contain many useful background facts, and because I can tell the difference between historical facts and the biased interpretation of historical facts.  It is worth pointing out that the “Special Catholic Edition,” though entirely the work of Protestant scholars, simply lets the texts of the Early Church speak for themselves, and Catholic Christians can simply read them as they are and recognize them as Catholic, while the standard Protestant Edition needs to couch the Early Church documents in biased essays to make them more palatable to Protestant readers, though quite frankly, I remember from my Evangelical Protestant days, they are still generally quite uncomfortable to read from the usual Protestant assumptions, as they are in fact pervaded with not only terms  and practices but a whole mindset that is distinctly Catholic not Protestant – which is one of the reasons Protestant Christians should be open to dialoguing with Catholic Christians about just what Catholic Christians have best preserved from the Undivided Early Church, things which in fact protect the Catholic Church from the “doctrinal liberalism” and unorthodoxy so prevalent in precisely the oldest Protestant “mainline” churches most mature in their Protestantism – though the Protestant churches also contain much to enrich the Catholic Communion in reunification).

[The point of this unfinished section hastily added to the very end of my first draft and first Internet Edition of So That The World May Believe is that the modern easy access to ancient and more recent Christian documents (in both print and electronic editions) allows for very efficient scholarship even though it is still a colossal job to go through the mountains of material.  When this access is coupled with a sense of the Christian obligation to seek reunification in accordance with Jesus’ prayer for Christian unity, it is relatively easy to see how similar the faith of divided Christians is and how irrelevant to our brotherhood in Christ are the to-be-expected human failings on all sides in history which are usually foolishly cited as excuses to remain divided and therefore to remain largely ineffective against Satan’s Kingdom of Darkness which has such an obvious influence in our world despite the 2 Billion (divided) Christians on it (Satan’s strategy to “divide and conquer” the Christian Church has been too effective for far too long and we must not allow it to continue).  It is this current easy access to material from ancient to modern history and from all Christian perspectives that has allowed me to see the “golden threads” stretching from Biblical history since Adam through to the Undivided Early First Millennium Christian Church’s history through to modern times and to come up with (I am certain through the  Holy Spirit of Unity’s aid, as well as that of my professor Scott Hahn who put so much of it together with his Covenant Theology) my “Family Theology” interpretation of Covenant Family history since Adam which incorporates the traditional Christian orthodoxy so important to each of today’s divided fundamentally orthodox Christian churches, the texts of both Testaments, Undivided Early Church history, and the history of the divided Christian Churches since: an interpretation which respects the genuine Christian character and dignity of all the divided Churches, an interpretation which does not hide Christian failures but understands the history of many failures in Christian love and faithfulness on all sides as part of the New Covenant Family going through a process of maturation in love which all the Covenant Families since Adam had to go through (therefore we should not be surprised and should not hold grudges which keep us immature in love and divided), an interpretation of the Bible and of history since the Canon of the Bible was closed which should allow us to gradually recapture the early Christian success at being one Undivided Christian Church and Body of Christ Jesus Himself which was lost because of Christian immaturity in the New Covenant standards of love Jesus gave us to strive towards which He did not expect us to master right away, as none of the other previous Covenant Families had .]

If you were informed, educated, inspired, touched or intrigued by this book, please prayerfully consider supporting the free internet publication of more books like it by going to Prayer and Donations Support 

Works Consulted 

[For this current first draft and first Internet Edition, I will just insert here the Bibliographies or Works Consulted of some of the other essays and research papers of mine which were used in the making of this present three-volume book, without taking the time of combining them into a single alphabetized list due to the current circumstances which indefinitely prevent me from working further on this book (to help change this, see Prayer and Donation Support).  There are several other books in addition to the above-mentioned dozens of electronic Bible commentaries and the 38-volume collection of the writings of the Early Church Fathers from Apostolic times to 600 AD which eventually will be added to this list.]

[This was the Works Consulted for the original term paper of my later book manuscript Love Unbounded: Tracing Salvation History from the Eternal Trinity to the New Covenant Church – Using Family Theology to Answer the Question How and Why Does Jesus’ Death Save Us?]

The Holy Bible : New International Version. electronic ed. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996, c1984.

Alexander, T. Desmond, and Brian S. Rosner. New Dictionary of Biblical Theology. electronic ed. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2001.

Benin, Stephen D.  The Footprints of God: Divine Accommodation in Jewish and Christian Thought.  Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993.

Brown, Raymond Edward, Joseph A. Fitzmyer, and Roland Edmund Murphy. The Jerome Biblical Commentary. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1996, c1968.

Carson, D. A. New Bible Commentary : 21st Century Edition. 4th ed. Leicester, England; Downers Grove, Ill., USA: Inter-Varsity Press, 1994.

Danielou, Jean.  From Shadows to Reality: Studies in the Biblical Typology of the Fathers.  Westminster: Burns and Oates Ltd., 1960.

Dauphinais, Michael and Matthew Levering.  Knowing the Love of Christ: An Introduction to the Theology of Saint Thomas Aquinas.  Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2002.

Elwell, Walter A. Vol. 3, Evangelical Commentary on the Bible. Baker reference library. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Book House, 1996, c1989.

Enns, Paul P. The Moody Handbook of Theology. Chicago, Ill.: Moody Press, 1997, c1989.

Ferguson, Sinclair B., and J.I. Packer. New Dictionary of Theology. electronic ed. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000, c1988.

Hahn, Scott.  A Father Who Keeps His Promises: God’s Covenant Love in Scripture.  Ann Arbor, MI: Servant, 1998.

Hahn, Scott. First Comes Love: Finding Your Family in the Church and the Trinity.  New York: Doubleday, 2002.

Hahn, Scott and Leon J. Surprenant, Jr., editors. Catholic for a Reason: Scripture and the Mystery of the Family of God.  Steubenville : Emmaus Road, 1998.

Hasseveldt, Roger.  The Church: A Divine Mystery.  Notre Dame: Fides Publishers, 1954.

Hawthorne, Gerald F., Ralph P. Martin, and Daniel G. Reid. Dictionary of Paul and His Letters. Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press, 1993.

Kittel, Gerhard, Gerhard Friedrich, and Geoffrey William Bromiley. Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans, 1995, c1985.

Komonchak, Joseph A., Mary Collins, and Dermot A. Lane. The New Dictionary of Theology. electronic ed. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2000, c1991.

Martin, Ralph P., and Peter H. Davids. Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Developments. electronic ed. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000, c1997.

Meldau, Fred John. The Prophets Still Speak : Messiah in Both Testaments. Bellmawr: Friends of Israel Gospel Ministry, 1997, c1988.

Ocariz, F., L.F. Mateo Seco and J.A. Riestra.  The Mystery of Jesus Christ: A Christology and Soteriology Textbook.  Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1994.

Packer, J. I. Concise Theology : A Guide to Historic Christian Beliefs. Wheaton, Ill.: Tyndale House, 1995, c1993.

Roberts, Alexander, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. The Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol.I : Translations of the Writings of the Fathers Down to A.D. 325. Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, 1997.

Roberts, Alexander, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. The Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol. III : Translations of the Writings of the Fathers Down to A.D. 325. Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, 1997.

Roberts, Alexander, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. The Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol. V : Translations of the Writings of the Fathers Down to A.D. 325. Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, 1997.

Ryken, Leland, Jim Wilhoit, Tremper Longman et al.. Dictionary of Biblical Imagery. electronic ed. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2000, c1998.

Schaff, Philip. The Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers Vol. III. Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, 1997.

Schonborn, Christoph. Loving the Church.  San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1998.

Vine, W.E., and F.F. Bruce. Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words. Old Tappan NJ: Revell, 1981; Published in electronic form by Logos Research Systems, 1996.

Walvoord, John F., Roy B. Zuck, and Dallas Theological Seminary. The Bible Knowledge Commentary : An Exposition of the Scriptures. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1983-c1985.

Wood, D. R. W., D. R. W. Wood, and I. Howard Marshall. New Bible Dictionary. electronic ed. of 3rd ed. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 1996, c1982, c1962.

Wright, Christopher J.H.  Knowing Jesus Through the Old Testament.  Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992.

[This Bibliography is from the term paper which was the core of Who is Mary in the Church?, which is now Volume II of this present book]

De Montfort, Louis. True Devotion to Mary. Rockford, IL: Tan Publishers, 1985.

Hahn, Scott. Hail, Holy Queen: The Mother of God in the Word of God. New York: Doubleday, 2001.

Hahn, Scott.  Ordinary Work, Extraordinary Grace. New York: Doubleday, 2006.

Hahn, Scott and Leon J. Surprenant, Jr., editors. Catholic for a Reason: Scripture and the Mystery of the Family of God.  Steubenville : Emmaus Road, 1998.

The Holy Bible: King James Version. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1995.

The Holy Bible: New International Version. electronic ed. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996, c1984.

Manteau-Bonamy, H.M. Immaculate Conception and the Holy Spirit: The Marian Teachings of Saint            Maximilian Kolbe. Libertyville, IL: Marytown Press, 2001.

Miravalle, Mark. Introduction to Mary: The Heart of Marian Doctrine and Devotion. Santa Barbara, CA:               Queenship Publishing, 1993.

Miravalle, Mark. Mary: Coredemptrix, Mediatrix, Advocate. Santa Barbara, CA: Queenship Publishing, 1993.

Miravalle, Mark, ed. Mary: Coredemptrix, Mediatrix, Advocate: Theological Foundations, Towards A Papal Definition?. Santa Barbara, CA: Queenship Publishing, 1995.

Miravalle, Mark, ed. Mary: Coredemptrix, Mediatrix, Advocate: Theological Foundations II, Papal,                     Pneumatological, Ecumenical. Santa Barbara, CA: Queenship Publishing, 1996.

Suprenant, Leon J., ed. Catholic for a Reason II: Scripture and the Mystery of the Mother of God.    Steubenville, Ohio: Emmaus Road Publishing, 2000.

Synod of the Hierarchy of the Ukrainian Catholic Church. The Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom.    Etobicoke, ON: Basilian Press, 1988.

Vol. 1, Vatican Council II : The Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents. electronic ed. of the new revised ed. Vatican Collection ; Logos Library System. Northport NY: Costello Publishing, 1992; Published in electronic form by Logos Research Systems, 1996.

Welcome to the Catholic Church on CD-ROM Version 3.0: The Complete Interactive Guide to                     Catholicism.  Salem, OR: Harmony Media, 2001. [Source of Redemptoris Mater]

[This is the Bibliography for my short essay later retitled One Body One Spirit: The Prehistory of the Charismatic Renewal Movement from Pentecost to Pentecostalism Unleashed by the Pope]

Armstrong, David.  Recent Popes’ and Bishops’ Statements Concerning the Catholic Charismatic Renewal.  http://ic.net/~RAZ284.htm

Gaudet, Val.  “A Woman and the Pope: Elena Guerra and Pope Leo XIII: Forerunners of the Charismatic Renewal in the Church Today.”  New Covenant. October 1973: 4-6.

 

The Holy Bible : New International Version. electronic ed. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996, c1984.

International Catholic Charismatic Renewal Services.  International Catholic Charismatic Renewal Services Website.  http://iccrs.org/english.htm

Libreria Editrice Vaticana.  Catechism of the Catholic Church. Ottawa: Publications Service, Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, 1992.

McDonnell, Kilian & George T. Montague, eds. Fanning the Flame: What Does Baptism in the Holy Spirit Have To Do with Christian Initiation? Collegeville, Minnesota:  The             Liturgical Press, 1991.

Nee, Watchman.  Spiritual Authority.  New York: Christian Fellowship Publishers, Inc., 1972.

Vol. 1, Vatican Council II : The Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents. electronic ed. of the new revised ed. Vatican Collection ; Logos Library System. Northport NY: Costello Publishing, 1992; Published in electronic form by Logos Research Systems, 1996.

[other Bibliographies and Works Consulted]

Butler, Scott, Norman Dahlgren, Rev. Mr. David Hess.  Jesus, Peter & the Keys: A Scriptural Handbook on the Papacy. Santa Barbarba, CA: Queenship Publishing Company, 1996.

Congar, Yves M.-J.  Tradition & Traditions.   Trans. Naseby, Michael and Thomas Rainborough. San Diego, CA: Basilica Press, 1966.

Currie, David B.  Born Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic.  San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press, 1996.

De Lubac, Henri.  The Splendor of the Church.  San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press, 1999, c1986.

Hahn, Scott and Leon J. Surprenant, Jr., editors. Catholic for a Reason: Scripture and the Mystery of the Family of God.  Steubenville : Emmaus Road, 1998.

The Holy Bible : King James Version. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1995.

The Holy Bible : New International Version. electronic ed. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996, c1984.

The New Jerusalem Bible. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1995, c1985.

Roberts, Alexander, James Donaldson, and A. Cleveland Coxe. The Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol.I : Translations of the Writings of the Fathers Down to A.D. 325. Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, 1997.

Shea, Mark P.  By What Authority?: An Evangelical Discovers Catholic Tradition.  Huntington, IN: Our Sunday Visitor Publishing Division, 1996.

Vine, W.E., and F.F. Bruce. Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words. Old Tappan NJ: Revell, 1981; Published in electronic form by Logos Research Systems, 1996.

Butler, S., N. Dahlgren & D. Hess. Jesus, Peter and the Keys: A Scriptural Handbook on the Papacy. Santa Barbara, CA: Queenship Publishing, 1996. 

Curtis, A.K., J.S. Lang, R. Petersen. The 100 Most Important Events in Christian History. Grand Rapids: Fleming H. Revell, 1998.

Denzinger, H. The Sources of Catholic Dogma. Trans. R. Deferrari.  Binghampton, NY: B. Herder Book Co., 1957.

Douglas, J. D., P. W. Comfort, & D. Mitchell. Who’s Who in Christian History. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House, 1997, c1992.

Laux, J. Church History: A Complete History of the Catholic Church to the Present Day. Rockford, IL: TAN Books and Publishers, 1989.

Roberts, A., J. Donaldson, & A. C. Coxe. The Ante-Nicene Fathers Vol.I : Translations of the Writings of the Fathers Down to A.D. 325. Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, 1997.

Schaff, P. & D.S. Schaff.  History of the Christian Church. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997.

Schaff, P. The Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers Second Series Vol. XIV. Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, 1997.

Schreck, A. Catholic Church History from A to Z. Ann Arbor, MI: Servant Publications, 2002.

The Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent.  Transl. Schroeder, H.J. Rockford: Tan  Books and Publishers, 1978.

Congar, Yves M.-J.  Tradition & Traditions.   Trans. Naseby, Michael and Thomas Rainborough. San Diego, CA: Basilica Press, 1966.

The Holy Bible : New International Version. electronic ed. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1996, c1984.

Ker, Ian. Newman and the Fullness of Christianity.  Edinburgh: T&T Clark Ltd., 1993. 

 

Komonchak, Joseph A., Mary Collins, and Dermot A. Lane. The New Dictionary of Theology. electronic ed. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2000, c1991.

Libreria Editrice Vaticana.  Catechism of the Catholic Church. Ottawa: Publications Service, Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, 1992.

 

The New Jerusalem Bible. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1995, c1985.

Newman, John Henry.  An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine.  Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1989.

Vol. 1, Vatican Council II : The Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents. electronic ed. of the new revised ed. Vatican Collection ; Logos Library System. Northport NY: Costello Publishing, 1992; Published in electronic form by Logos Research Systems, 1996.

Vorgrimler, Herbert, ed. Commentary on the Documents of Vatican II, Volume III.  New York: Herder and Herder, 1969.

© 2005, 2009 Peter William John Baptiste SFO

If you were informed, educated, inspired, touched or intrigued by this book, please prayerfully consider supporting the free internet publication of more books like it by going to Prayer and Donations Support

Go To the Forward & Introduction to all Three Volumes of So That The World May Believe

 

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