14- THE PATRIARCHATE OF JERUSALEM

Go To the Beginning of this Booklet The Spread of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the First Millennium of the Undivided Early Church: An Overview of the Family Theology that Revolutionizes Bible Reading and its Implications Towards the Eventual Re-Establishment of the Undivided Early Church’s Unity in Diversity

Some Undivided Early Church First Millennium Highlights of the Pentarchy of the First Five Christian Patriarchates and their Contributions to the One Universal Church of Christ

THE PATRIARCHATE OF JERUSALEM

Center of the Jewish Culture as Renewed in Jesus, the Foundational Jewish Rite of the Catholic (Universal) Christian Church which brought the Gospel to all others

Recognized as a Patriarchate at the 4th Ecumenical Council 451 AD, Which Defined That Jesus Is Fully God and Fully Man Against the Monophysite Christian Heretics

Site of the First Church Council or Proto-Council Recorded in Acts 15, Biblical Pattern of All Later Ecumenical Councils of the Catholic (Universal) Christian Church

The Early Church Fathers such as Saint Jerome report that no Jewish Christians died in the First Jewish War of 70 AD in which the Temple was destroyed (in fulfilment of much Biblical prophecy including that of Jesus in Matthew 24), because the Jewish Christians recognized the signs of Jesus’ warnings and got out of the city.  After the non-Christian Jews under false messiah Simeon bar Cochba lost the Second Jewish War of 135 AD, the pagan Romans scattered the Jews from their homeland until modern times (the re-establishment of the Jewish State of Israel in 1948), building the Roman city of Aelia Capitolina over the ruins of Jerusalem.  Biblical, Second Temple Era Judaism ended with the destruction of the Temple and priesthood and the destruction of Israel as a nation in their own land, which necessitated that Judaism be recodified and regularized if it was to survive at all, and so it was that the rabbis of the Pharisees, the only Jewish leaders (of many previous different sects) to survive the Second Jewish War, started codifying all Judaism in a “final form” (an anti-Christian form), in the Mishnah and Talmud, as the official interpretive guides to practising the Jewish faith without a Temple or priests or land (this is modern Judaism, which is younger than Christianity).  Meanwhile the foundational Jewish Rite of the Catholic Christian Church, which was the portion of God’s “first-born son” nation of Israel which accepted its true Messiah and in the power of the Holy Spirit finally fulfilled the mission God had given Israel of bringing the fallen-away “other son” nations descended from faithful Noah back to God within the Universal (Catholic) Christian Communion, because it was a minority of Jews even before the Jews were scattered abroad, did not survive as a distinct Christian Rite but the few Jewish Rite Christians in any given area were gradually absorbed into the mass ranks of Gentile Christians through intermarriage and so on.  Possibly this was God’s will so that the Gentile Rites could establish themselves without being inappropriately dominated by the Foundational Rite which even in New Testament times struggled with the temptation of “Judaizing” the new Gentile Christians, and also so that the majority non-Christian Jews could eventually enter the Universal (Catholic) Christian Communion exactly the same way the Gentile Romans, Greeks, Egyptians, and Syrians had entered it humbly, as a nation once fallen away from God’s ongoing Covenant Family since Adam, but restored in Christ Jesus, with a distinct cultural response to and celebration of the Gospel of Jesus which enriches all the others within the Catholic (Universal) Christian Communion.

Even though Jerusalem was destroyed and the Jews scattered and a pagan Roman city built on top of its ruins, because it was the birthplace of the Church Jerusalem remained very special to all Christians.  Even though the original Jewish Rite of the Christian Church centered in Jerusalem did not survive the scattering of the Jews (and even though the unfortunate policy of assimilation of individual Jewish converts had entered the Church), when the Early Christian Church had Ecumenical Councils which established the fundamentals of orthodox Christianity and which formally recognized the four major different Gentile cultural Sister Churches centered in Antioch, Alexandria, Rome and Constantinople as Patriarchates, Christians could not imagine the Holy City of Jerusalem not also being given the dignity and honor of being recognized as a Patriarchate.  Thus even though it had become mostly Gentile and was not a major center of Christianity whose overseer/bishop pastorally guided a Christian Rite followed by vast numbers of Christians, like all the other Patriarchates were, Jerusalem was still declared a Patriarchate, specifically in honor of the original (Jewish Rite) Christian Church of Jerusalem which brought the Gospel of Jesus to all the other Rites.  If the current Association of Hebrew Catholics and/or other Jewish faith communities which seek to embrace Jesus as Israel’s Messiah (as ‘Messianic Jews’ have) are ever formally made into a new Hebrew or Jewish Rite of the Catholic Church in the process of the Catholic Church’s reforming itself according to the model of the Undivided Early Catholic Church, as the Catholic Church’s 21st Ecumenical Council (Vatican II) prepares the way for, the new Hebrew/Jewish Rite should most appropriately be established under the ancient Patriarchate of Jerusalem.

© 2008 Peter William John Baptiste SFO

Go To the Next Section Some Undivided Early Church First Millennium Highlights of the Pentarchy of the First Five Christian Patriarchates and their Contributions to the One Universal Church of Christ: THE PATRIARCHATE OF ANTIOCH

Go To the Beginning of this Booklet The Spread of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the First Millennium of the Undivided Early Church: An Overview of the Family Theology that Revolutionizes Bible Reading and its Implications Towards the Eventual Re-Establishment of the Undivided Early Church’s Unity in Diversity